Daily water needs, Quotes around the world
December 1, 2007 | posted by Nigerian Muse (Archives)


 


Daily water needs....Quotes around the world


1 m3. = 1000 Litres = 264 US gallons

 



http://www.veoliawater.com/services/municipal-customers/water-management/issues/
Daily water consumption per capita, excluding agricultural requirements, has risen to 300 liters in the United States, 100 to 200 liters in Europe, and only some tens of liters in some countries in the Third World.



http://www.answers.com/topic/water-supply
In the United States, the average residential daily water supply demand is 100 gal (380 liters) per person, although it can go as high as 500 gal (1900 liters) per person.



http://www.commondreams.org/views06/0308-29.htm
In Britain, the average person uses 160 litres of clean water each day. In rural Mozambique or Ethiopia, people use what women and young girls can carry back from rivers and lakes: around 5-10 litres a day for each person. The iconic image of a woman carrying water belies a more brutal reality. You try carrying a 20-litre bucket of water for four miles in the baking sun.



http://www.asianresearch.org/articles/2987.html

Chinese urbanites have increased their per capita daily water consumption about 150% between 1980 and 2000—from less than 100 liters in 1980 to 244 liters in 2000. At least 20% of the water supplies to cities are lost through leaky pipes, so this official per capita consumption figure underestimates total urban water use.




http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/Story.asp?Article=201401&Sn=BNEW&IssueID=30254 "They said each person in Bahrain uses 600 litres of water daily compared to the worldwide standard of 180 litres per individual.



http://www.environmentprobe.org/EnviroProbe/index.cfm?DSP=content&ContentID=2392
Water use is 70 per cent higher in homes that don't have volume-based rates. Flat-rate customers in Canada use 457 litres of water per day; volume-based consumers use 269 litres per day. Personal water use by people living in Canadian municipalities is on the rise, from an average of 327 litres per person per day in 1996 to 343 litres per person per day in 1999 (not including industrial and agricultural use). In Germany, daily per capita water use is 128 litres, in the United Kingdom, 149 litres.




http://64.233.169.104/search?q=cache:4R8dITYlITcJ:www.cwec.ca/cwec/Documents/Teachers/small%2520world.pdf+daily+water+need+of+municipalities+liters&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=17&gl=us

The United Nations High Commission for Refugees estimates that an average human needs a minimum of 30 litres of water per day – 5 litres for drinking and cooking, 25 litres or more to keep clean. The average Canadian uses about 340 litres of water per day. Europeans use about 140 litres per day. In Africa, the average person uses 3 litres per day. Note that this does not include other water uses or technologies that use water at home or in the work place.
 




http://www.ec.gc.ca/Water/en/info/pubs/sss/e_mun2001.htm
In 2001, average residential water use per person fell to 335 litres per day – the second lowest rate since 1991 – thus resuming a 10-year downward trend that has been interrupted only once (by a slight upswing in 1999; see Chart 1). This positive trend notwithstanding, Canadians still rank among the most prodigious consumers of water among OECD countries.

The survey results indicate that people living in larger communities use less water than do those living in smaller towns. For example, residential water use ranged from 300 litres per day in municipalities with a population of 500 000 or more, to 466 litres per day in municipalities with a population between 2000 and 5000 (see Table 1). ...

Furthermore, all surveys since at least 1991 indicate that, both nationally and provincially, Canadians use more water when they are charged a flat rate. The 2001 survey shows that in municipalities that charged according to the volume of water used (using 100% metering as a proxy2), the average daily consumption rate was 272 litres per person; in communities that charged a flat or fixed rate (using 0% metering as a proxy3 ), the corresponding figure was 74% higher (474 litres per person). These findings suggest that metering and volume-based pricing can be valuable demand-management tools for promoting the responsible use of water resources....

For the 978 municipalities that responded to this question (representing 23.8 million Canadians served water, or a total municipal population of 25.5 million), total water use (all sectors combined, including system losses) works out to a daily average of 622 litres per person served water (see Table 1). Daily per capita water use is generally lower in larger municipalities than in smaller ones. For example, municipalities with 2000 to 5000 residents used 732 litres per person per day, on average, whereas those with 50 000 to 500 000 residents used 596 litres per person per day. The sole exception involves municipalities with more than 500 000 people, where the average daily per capita use was 614 litres. Residential water use shows a similar downward trend as municipal population rises. The fact that per capita municipal water use generally goes down as the metering rate goes up (for residential and business clients alike) suggests again that the use of water meters can help reduce water use in most municipalities4.




http://www.guelphcivicleague.ca/articles.php?a=14
Okotoks presently consumes 373 litres of water per day per capita. Calgary consumes 510 lites per day. The European average is 135 litres per day.




http://www.toronto.ca/watereff/home.htm
Indoor water use
Water use in the residential sector accounts for about 52 per cent of all the water supplied in the City of Toronto. This is also known as the average winter day demand. About 248 litres of water per person per day is used inside the home. See the graph below for a breakdown of indoor water use.

The average winter day demand is not the same as total per capita consumption per capita consumption. Per capita consumption is about 510 litres per person per day. This number takes the total water supplied and divides it by the total population of Toronto. Per capita consumption incorporates all sectors in the city: residential, commercial, industrial and institutional.


 

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